How do we make it stop? How have you dealt with it? That’s what we’re all going to be posting on this week. If you’d like to join us, click here to share your thoughts

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yogachocolatelove:

He llegado.
Estoy en casa.
Cada paso es mi destino. 

The phrase, “It’s not your fault,” has saturated the sphere of mental health to a point where it has become a banal platitude… but there is a reason for that: it’s true. Having a mental illness is never the fault of the sufferer; it’s a disease, and should be treated and respected as such.

I do, however, have something to add to the ‘it’s not your fault’ phraseology; I’d posit that a more effective mantra would be: ‘it’s not your fault, but it is your responsibility’. This may sound excessively harsh, but please hear me out.

A few months into my recovery, I was sitting in a peer support group when someone told me the following: “You can’t control what happens to you, but you can control how you react to it.” Obviously this is easier said than done, but when I did accept this as Truth (note the capital-T), my recovery was vastly expedited.

Ultimately, recovery comes from within, and if you never initiate change, why should you expect anything to be different?

- Andrew

Andrew`s personal blog, Lunch With The Punks, explores the idea that no emotion is inherently negative or positive; the actions that result are what dictate the emotion`s charge. 

dreaming-in-techni-color:

"Let go or be dragged." Zen Proverb

Mental Health PSA: You’re Not Special
I absolutely adore the internet; I love the fact that I can look up anything at any time, and immediately settle a petty bar-bet. I love that I can buy googly-eyes in bulk at four in the morning. But most of all, I love that the internet, much like Soylent Green, is people. But I digress. To go back to my main point, you are not special.
…Well, at least not with respect to your mental-illness. No matter how fucked up you may feel, or how much you think nobody understands you, or what you’ve been through, I promise you people do. Others have been through it.
The more I have read and talked about people’s battles with depression and OCD (and mental-illness in general), the more I realized just how similar many of our stories are. Sure compulsions or specific thoughts may differ, but by and large, thought patterns and themes seem to be similar across the world. This is one of the things that makes peer-support so effective for recovery: empathy of peers, and advice from people with lived experience.
Obviously, speaking openly about your personal struggle with mental illness may be difficult, and that’s where the internet comes in. Not only is it as anonymous as you’d like it to be, but with roughly 2.9 Billion internet users, and countless mental-health related websites, blogs, forums, sub-reddits, hashtags etc., there is someone else out there with a remarkably similar experience. Go out and find them, and celebrate being not-special together.
- Andrew
Andrew`s personal blog, Lunch With The Punks, explores the idea that no emotion is inherently negative or positive; the actions that result are what dictate the emotion`s charge.  

Mental Health PSA: You’re Not Special

I absolutely adore the internet; I love the fact that I can look up anything at any time, and immediately settle a petty bar-bet. I love that I can buy googly-eyes in bulk at four in the morning. But most of all, I love that the internet, much like Soylent Green, is people. But I digress. To go back to my main point, you are not special.

…Well, at least not with respect to your mental-illness. No matter how fucked up you may feel, or how much you think nobody understands you, or what you’ve been through, I promise you people do. Others have been through it.

The more I have read and talked about people’s battles with depression and OCD (and mental-illness in general), the more I realized just how similar many of our stories are. Sure compulsions or specific thoughts may differ, but by and large, thought patterns and themes seem to be similar across the world. This is one of the things that makes peer-support so effective for recovery: empathy of peers, and advice from people with lived experience.

Obviously, speaking openly about your personal struggle with mental illness may be difficult, and that’s where the internet comes in. Not only is it as anonymous as you’d like it to be, but with roughly 2.9 Billion internet users, and countless mental-health related websites, blogs, forums, sub-reddits, hashtags etc., there is someone else out there with a remarkably similar experience. Go out and find them, and celebrate being not-special together.

- Andrew

Andrew`s personal blog, Lunch With The Punks, explores the idea that no emotion is inherently negative or positive; the actions that result are what dictate the emotion`s charge.